Alumni News

BYU Campus Cougar Den


Looking at his office—crammed with BYU helmets, hats, pens, mugs, jerseys, T-shirts, and one-of-a-kind memorabilia—you might think Adam W. Parker is the consummate BYU fan. Well, he is a fan, but the Cougar look to his Hinckley Center workspace actually reflects his profession.

As the trademarks and licensing specialist on campus, Parker evaluates more than 5,000 requests to use BYU branding each year. Parker rejects some submissions—like those involving alcohol or guns—outright. Others get the go-ahead after they make changes to meet the approved use of trademarks, logos, and color.

“Don’t ask for anything in red,” Parker says. “That’s Utah’s color. The closest we come to crimson is a raspberry hue.”

From hats, T-shirts, and banners to Pillow Pets, duct tape, and fingernail shields—BYU branding finds a welcome home on an assortment of memorabilia through manager Adam Parker in the BYU Licensing and Trademark Office.

From hats, T-shirts, and banners to Pillow Pets, duct tape, and fingernail shields—BYU branding finds a welcome home on an assortment of memorabilia through manager Adam Parker in the BYU Licensing and Trademark Office.

Among those who seek Parker’s approval on products are several BYU alumni. Christy Pierce Hepworth (BA ’04), her husband, and her sisters create designer fingernail shields made from a solid film covering. “We sell all over the country, and when we decided to do collegiate marketing, we obviously thought of BYU,” says Adam G. Hepworth (’02). Jamberry Nails, based out of Lindon, Utah, now offers blue fingernail shields adorned with white Ys.

David L. Gormley (BS ’87) of Fort Collins, Colo., founded the hat company Zephyr 10 years ago. A BYU fan and hat enthusiast, Gormley wears hats everywhere—except church meetings and funerals. Z hats, as they are popularly called, are found in markets worldwide. His BYU hats come in many styles, including retro models with vintage logos from the “college vault.”

Parker also approves crafters’ requests for handmade items, such as a wood necktie made with dozens of wood squares and logo cupcakes for a farmers market. “I’m always surprised at the creativity of our submissions,” Parker says.

— Charlene Renberg Winters (BA ’73, MA ’96)